Street Safety when Out and About

As we travel to different cities or explore unfamiliar streets while visiting local attractions, it is always important to be aware and vigilant concerning you and your families’ personal safety.

Here are some tips to remember:

Walking

Staying alert and tuned into your surroundings so you can avoid/anticipate where trouble may be lurking. In addition, remind yourself to stand tall and walk briskly and confidently. This is a behavior that potential criminals tend to avoid. And if you ever feel uncomfortable or have that little warning feeling in your gut about the place or situation you are in, leave as quickly as you can!

  • Try to use well-lit busy streets. Whenever you can, avoid passing on the side of a street with a vacant lot, alley, or deserted construction site. If you must pass by, do so quickly and confidently!
  • Try to explore or jog with a buddy. There is safety in numbers.
  • Carry your purse or handbag close to your body and keep a firm grip on it. Your wallet should go in an inside coat pocket or front pants pocket.

If wearing a backpack, take it off and hold it close to your body. This will prevent an attacker from grabbing you from behind by the backpack and throwing you to the ground.

Don’t overload yourself with store packages that signal you have valuables ripe for the grabbing.

And finally – wear comfortable, stable shoes that will help, instead of hinder, your stability or a quick getaway.

In the unfortunate situation where someone does try to rob you:

  1. Don’t resist and get into a tussle with them – give up your property. For example – toss your wallet as far as you can. This way, the assailant will typically go for your wallet.
  2. Try to remember to carry a whistle or mace when walking in unknown territory, but if you don’t have it, and you are accosted, yell, “Help, Fire!” This is more likely to draw attention to you.
  3. Report the crime to the local law enforcement. Try to describe the attacker accurately. Your actions can help prevent others from being victims.

Driving

  • When you park, always lock your car and take the keys, even if you’ll only be gone a short time.
  • When you drive, be on the lookout for any signals that indicate an environment where you might be at risk – such as empty streets during normal day/evening times, abandoned cars, missing signs, malfunctioning traffic lights, reckless drivers, or poor street lighting — particularly near stop signs or lights.
  • In the unfortunate situation where your car breaks down – even with a flat tire, try to drive it to the first well-lit area you can find. (For example, a store parking lot or gas station.) Raise the hood or tie a white cloth to the street-side door handle. Stay in the locked car. If someone stops to help, crack your window only slightly and ask him or her to phone for assistance if you haven’t already. It’s also a good idea to call the police for help when you’re in a potentially vulnerable situation.
  • Be extra alert when using enclosed parking garages. Park near other cars, entrances, or exits. Upon return, as you approach your car to get back inside, always glance under the frame, then the back and front seats. If you must leave a key with the lot attendant, make sure to give them only the ignition or valet key.
  • Always carry an emergency kit in your car. It should contain a flashlight, flares, and first aid products.

Riding Buses, Subways, and Elevators

  • Sit near the bus driver or pick the subway car that has several other passengers.
  • Use well-lit, busy stops or terminals only.
  • Stay alert to those around you! Don’t doze, daydream, or get lost in reading or social media while in transit.
  • If someone harasses you, don’t be embarrassed. Loudly say “Leave me alone!” If that doesn’t work, hit the emergency device.
  • Watch who gets off with you and exit with the crowd. Don’t linger waiting to exit alone. If you feel uneasy, walk directly to a place where there are other people present.
  • If you find you must use an elevator alone at night – when the doors open, check to see if there is anyone already there. Often it is a snap judgment, but if there is only one person on board or you get an uneasy feeling from those onboard, step away quickly and say you forgot something.
  • Always stand near the controls in an elevator. If a stranger gets on that makes you uneasy, press the button for the next floor and get off. If accosted, press the alarm button immediately.

At Secur-Tek, Inc. we specialize and care about your safety, and urge you to stay alert while out and about, whether here in the Triangle or visiting a new location.

And if you do travel, remember you can have greater peace of mind if we are protecting your family, pets, and property. Call us at 919.387.1800 or use the form below for information and a complimentary quote on a home security system or upgrade.

Security & Home Automation